Consumer Glucometers Harnessed to Detect Disease Biomarkers

Consumer Glucometers Harnessed to Detect Disease Biomarkers

Glucose monitors have been used for decades to monitor diabetes, but now they may also be harnessed to detect biomarkers for a variety of diseases. Researchers in China are now taking advantage of contemporary glucometers to detect biomarkers previously requiring expensive and bulky equipment. The team filled liposomes with an enzyme that produces glucose and made the liposomes so that they break open when in the presence of a molecule being looked for. When the liposome containers burst open, they release the cargo that in turn raises the levels of glucose of the solution they’re in. A simple glucometer can be used to measure the glucose in the solution, and any increase after the administration of the liposomes is indicative of the presence of the target molecules. The team tested the technology by looking for thrombin. They showed that a consumer glucometer was able to accurately measure the concentration of thrombin using the lyposome technique the team developed. Study in Applied Materials & Interfaces: Enzyme-Encapsulated Liposome-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Enabling Sensitive Personal Glucose Meter Readout for Portable Detection of Disease Biomcardiac… Via: ACS Image credit: Phil King The post Consumer Glucometers Harnessed to Detect Disease Biomarkers appeared first on...
NURO System for Overactive Bladder Released by Medtronic

NURO System for Overactive Bladder Released by Medtronic

Medtronic is launching the NURO System for treating people with overactive bladder who experience urinary urgency, urinary frequency, and urge incontinence. The device, originally developed by Advanced Uro-Solutions, a Tennessee company later acquired by Medtronic, sends electrical stimulation pulses to the tibial nerve. This is done by inserting a thin needle into the skin near the ankle and attaching an electrode from the NURO to it. The NURO then sends electric current pulses during thirty minute weekly sessions that are supposed to be administered for twelve weeks. If the therapy wasn’t sufficiently effective but showed progress, the patient’s physician may choose to extend the therapy. The reason the system works is because there seems to be a communication inconsistency between the bladder and the brain that it re-tunes by sending the electric pulses that are simultaneously received by the brain and the bladder. Here’s a quick animation showing the usage of the NURO System: Source: Medtronic… The post NURO System for Overactive Bladder Released by Medtronic appeared first on...
Tenex TX2 MicroTip Ultrasonic Surgical Device for Tendenosis in Hip, Shoulder

Tenex TX2 MicroTip Ultrasonic Surgical Device for Tendenosis in Hip, Shoulder

Tenex Health (Lake Forest, CA) landed FDA clearance for its new TX2 MicroTip ultrasonic device for removal of soft tissue when treating tendinosis of the shoulder or hip. Percutaneous tenotomies can be performed in an outpatient setting with the device, which is a longer version of the TX1 MicroTip. The original generation of the device has a tip that’s too short for shoulder and hip procedures. The new device has a two inch tip which allows for a wider range of tenotomies to be performed with Tenex’s technology. “The TX1 MicroTip has enjoyed tremendous clinical success in treating over 35,000 patients in the US since its introduction in 2012,” said Dr. Bernard Morrey, Chief Medical Officer of Tenex Health. “Of these patients, only a small portion have been treated with shoulder or hip tendinosis due to the inaccessibility of the deeper tissues to the TX1 MicroTip. The length and design of the TX2 MicroTip is well poised to effectively treat a large number of patients with a spectrum of conditions in these anatomic areas. We anticipate providing a favorable safety and efficacy profile to a broader group of patients using this ultrasound guided treatment.” Source: Tenex Health… The post Tenex TX2 MicroTip Ultrasonic Surgical Device for Tendenosis in Hip, Shoulder appeared first on...
Microparticles Use Only Magnetic Fields for Navigation, Release of Therapeutics

Microparticles Use Only Magnetic Fields for Navigation, Release of Therapeutics

  Tiny therapeutic particles already exist that can be externally guided toward their destination and that can be triggered to release their cargo precisely where needed. Yet, they’ve all required two different energy sources to be used, often magnetism for navigation and near-infrared to open up the cargo doors. Now researchers at ETH Zurich in Switzerland have reported in journal Materials Horizons on new microparticles that use an external magnetic field for propulsion and guidance while being able to generate a local electric field from changes in the external magnetic field. This electric field is then used to release a drug, imaging agent, or some other compound stored within the particle’s interior. The SiO2 microspheres have a cobalt ferrite-barium titanate composite coating them. The magnetic field pulls on the iron and can drag the particle along. But, if  a specific pulse of the magnetic field is delivered over the particle, the bilayer warps and changes its volume, creating stress within the piezoelectric layer of the coating. This generates a tiny bit of electricity that is effectively a different kind of energy source that can be used to power the release of cargo or some other process within the microscopic device. From the study abstract: Here, we demonstrate this concept employing magnetoelectric Janus particle-based micromachines, which are fabricated by coating SiO2 microspheres with a CoFe2O4–BaTiO3bilayer composite. While the inner magnetic CoFe2O4 layer enables the micromachines to be maneuvered using low magnitude rotating magnetic fields, the magnetoelectric bilayer composite provides the ability to remotely generate electric charges upon the application of a time-varying magnetic field. To demonstrate the capabilities of these micromachines, noble metals...
Direct Flow Medical’s New DirecTrack Delivery System for TAVR Procedures Unveiled in Europe

Direct Flow Medical’s New DirecTrack Delivery System for TAVR Procedures Unveiled in Europe

Direct Flow Medical (Santa Rosa, CA) is launching in Europe its new DirecTrack Delivery System for the firm’s transcatheter aortic replacement valve. The new delivery system was designed to improve the ergonomic handling of the device while allowing for more accurate placement thanks to greater control available to the physician. “I have had the opportunity to use every generation of the Direct Flow Medical delivery system since its inception. The new DirecTrack system is a major step forward in positioning control and smooth valve delivery” said Joachim Schofer, M.D., Professor of Cardiology, Hamburg University Cardiovascular Center, Hamburg, in a statement.  “I’m impressed with the additional procedural efficiency gained, making it faster and easier to achieve an optimal outcome.” Via: Direct Flow Medical… The post Direct Flow Medical’s New DirecTrack Delivery System for TAVR Procedures Unveiled in Europe appeared first on...