LATERA Absorbable Implant Supports Cartilages to Treat Nasal Obstructions

LATERA Absorbable Implant Supports Cartilages to Treat Nasal Obstructions

Spirox, a company based in Menlo Park, California, won FDA clearance for its LATERA nasal implant. It’s designed to support the upper and lower lateral nasal cartilages in patients suffering from nasal valve collapse that causes obstructions and difficulty breathing. Eventually absorbed by the body after about 18 months, it’s expected to restore the natural strength of the nasal cavity. The LATERA delivered in a minimally invasive procedure without any visible cosmetic consequences following the procedure. The procedure itself is quick and takes only a few steps that an ENT or facial plastic surgeon would be comfortable with. A couple comments from physicians who have already used the LATERA according to Spirox’s announcement: “Nasal obstruction takes a significant toll on patient quality of life, but is often undertreated and underdiagnosed. If we don’t look for nasal valve collapse in these patients, we’re not addressing the entire problem. By providing an intuitive and effective way to support nasal lateral cartilage, LATERA has the potential to improve breathing for our patients,” said Dean Toriumi, MD, professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and past president of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons (AAFPRS). Pablo Stolovitzky, MD, clinical assistant professor at Emory Universityand past chairman of the Board of Governors of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS), was among the first physicians to perform a LATERA case in the US. He noted, “LATERA is an important development for nasal obstruction patients when a standard procedure treating the septum and turbinates is often not enough. LATERA provides us with a minimally-invasive solution to...
Chocolate Heart, a New Drug Coated PTCA Balloon Cleared in Europe

Chocolate Heart, a New Drug Coated PTCA Balloon Cleared in Europe

TriReme Medical (Pleasanton, California), part of QT Vascular, a company based in Singapore, received European regulatory approval for its new Chocolate Heart drug-coated percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloon for pushing apart stenoses in the coronary arteries. It’s a paclitaxel coated version of the Chocolate PTCA balloon, a device cleared in the U.S. a couple years ago. The company believes the drug coating will provide some patients the ability to receive treatment without leaving a stent behind. From QT Vascular: The FIH study of Chocolate Heart™ was conducted at CECANOT Hospital in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic in 19 patients with de novo coronary lesions. The results of this novel study were recently presented by the IVUS core lab principal investigator, Dr. Alexandre Abizaid of Dante Pazzanese Hospital in Sao Paolo, Brazil. In-hospital and after 30 days, the incidence of acute closure was 0% compared to over 9%2 for conventional balloon angioplasty. At 6 months, the late lumen loss was only 0.01mm with a rate of target lesion re-treatment of only 5%. Flashback: Chocolate PTCA Balloon for Coronary Stenosis Dilation Cleared in U.S… Via: QT Vascular… This post Chocolate Heart, a New Drug Coated PTCA Balloon Cleared in Europe appeared first on...
Super-resolution 3D Microscopy of Whole Cells Opens New Window for Scientists

Super-resolution 3D Microscopy of Whole Cells Opens New Window for Scientists

Yale University researchers have developed a new microscopy technique that allows them to have a 3D view of the insides of entire cells. Dubbed whole-cell 4Pi single-molecule switching nanoscopy (W-4PiSMSN), the method improves on a technique called 4Pi that uses two objectives to provide a 3D version of super-resolution microscopy. It allows researchers to pick specific structures to look at and the team that developed the technology has already visualized the endoplasmic reticulum, bacteriophages, mitochondria, nuclear pore complexes, primary cilia, Golgi-apparatus-associated COPI vesicles, and mouse spermatocyte synaptonemal complexes. Here’s a video produced by the microscopy technique of 19 mouse chromosomes: Study in journal Cell: Ultra-High Resolution 3D Imaging of Whole Cells… More from Yale… This post Super-resolution 3D Microscopy of Whole Cells Opens New Window for Scientists appeared first on...
A Surgeon Goes Hand-on With Microsoft’s Hololens

A Surgeon Goes Hand-on With Microsoft’s Hololens

Microsoft‘s Hololens has been getting a tremendous amount of attention over the past few years. Hype has been steadily accelerating about the technological, financial, and social potential for augmented reality, especially given the recent frenzy surrounding Pokemon Go. To clarify, while “mixed reality” is probably a more accurate term to describe a technology that blends simulated objects with your surroundings in an almost indistinguishable fashion, we will use the term “augmented reality” in this post as it is still more common. If you don’t have the time to read this lengthy hands-on, here is the low-down: Hololens is a very impressive technology with very compelling medical use-cases, although it currently has some limitations that seem like they will be addressed in later generations of the device. Keep in mind there are additional headsets to keep an eye on, including, but not limited to, the Daqri, Epson’s Moverio, Magic Leap, ODG’s R-7 Smartglasses, and the Meta 2. The health technology sector is very excited about the potential of augmented reality for a variety of applications. Health-related AR startups are already getting a lot of buzz and funding. One of the most talked about applications is the holographic anatomy educational program, which is the result of a partnership of Microsoft with Case Western Reserve University. Reading about the various applications and the technology is exciting, however it is hard to get an idea of the potential of the Hololens, and the limitations, without trying it yourself. Thanks to Neil Gupta, organizer of the Boston Augmented/Mixed Reality Meetup, and Microsoft, I was able to get hands on (or head in?) a Hololens and try it out for myself. We tried the Hololens in a sizable enclosed...
Talking Robot from MIT Helps Manage Labor Ward

Talking Robot from MIT Helps Manage Labor Ward

Triaging patients in a busy clinical environment can be a challenge. Patient needs have to be matched by proper staff and equipment while maximizing utility and preventing bottlenecks. A talking commercial toy robot tinkered by folks at MIT to think about triage, has been challenged with managing a labor ward at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Specifically, the Nao robot suggests which of the twenty rooms and which of the ten nurses the incoming patients should be directed to. The suggestions are just that, and have been compared to the decisions that staff made on their own, showing significant correlation. It’s not clear why one needs a physical talking robot instead of an indicator on a screen, but the underlying technology is what’s important anyways. Here’s a short video demonstrating the technology:     This post Talking Robot from MIT Helps Manage Labor Ward appeared first on...