7D Surgical’s Radiation-Free Image Guided Spinal Surgery System Gets U.S., Canada Clearances

7D Surgical’s Radiation-Free Image Guided Spinal Surgery System Gets U.S., Canada Clearances

7D Surgical, a company based in Toronto, Canada, won US FDA and Health Canada clearances to introduce its Machine-vision Image Guided Surgery (MIGS) system. The system allows for quick, radiation-free surgical navigation of the spine in preparation for delivering implants. Currently X-ray radiating intraoperative fluoroscopes are used to visualize the spine. The MIGS system relies only on visible light, the surgeon simply touching the vertebra in question in three spots using a registration device, and then holding the device for a few seconds on the vertebra to finish the process. It takes seconds to perform and you can start aligning the drill and beginning the intervention quickly and without exposure to radiation. Here are a couple quick promo videos introducing the MIGS system from 7D Surgical:   Product page: 7D Surgical System… Via: 7D Surgical… This post 7D Surgical’s Radiation-Free Image Guided Spinal Surgery System Gets U.S., Canada Clearances appeared first on...
WIRED Health Bringing Together Medical Innovators in London

WIRED Health Bringing Together Medical Innovators in London

The fifth annual WIRED Health conference will be held on March 9 in London, bringing together entrepreneurs, techies, and many others who are participating in digitizing and revolutionizing how medical care is delivered. We’ve attended WIRED events in the past, and they stand out for their breadth, a focus on discussing actual problems and solutions, and networking opportunities with really smart people. This year we again are proud to be a WIRED Health media partner. This year’s speakers include Emmanuelle Charpentier, co-inventor of CRISPR gene-editing technology that should help bring cures for a variety of diseases, Dame Sally Davies, chief medical officer for England, Department of Health, and Peter Piot, co-discoverer of Ebola and director of London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Info page and to register: WIRED Health… This post WIRED Health Bringing Together Medical Innovators in London appeared first on...
Tiny Acoustofluidic Chip Separates Nanoparticles from Liquid Samples to Detect Disease

Tiny Acoustofluidic Chip Separates Nanoparticles from Liquid Samples to Detect Disease

Scientists at Duke University have developed a way of concentrating nanoparticles inside a small device using only sound waves. This achievement may help introduce portable diagnostics that rely on attaching nanoparticles to  biomarkers such as proteins and measuring how many find their targets. Nanoparticles tagged with fluorescent markers to make them easier to see are concentrated in a column by a new acoustic whirlpool device. There is now a large selection of nanoparticles, and ways to attach them to different biomolecules, but separating them from the sample is still a challenge that typically requires bulky equipment operated by trained technicians. The new acoustofluidic chip is small enough to be integrated into hand-held devices and uses only five volts for power. From the study abstract in journal ACS Nano: Numerical simulations were used to elucidate the mechanism of the single vortex formation and were verified experimentally, demonstrating the focusing of silica and polystyrene particles ranging in diameter from 80 to 500 nm. Moreover, the acoustofluidic chip was used to conduct an immunoassay in which nanoparticles that captured fluorescently labeled biomarkers were concentrated to enhance the emitted signal. With its advantages in simplicity, functionality, and power consumption, the acoustofluidic chip we present here is promising for many point-of-care applications. A sample of 500 nanometer particles in solution. In the top image, the acoustic whirlpool device turned off. The bottom image shows that when the device is turned on, the nanoparticles are concentrated to the point of becoming visible as a dark line down the center of the chamber. Study in ACS Nano: Enriching Nanoparticles via Acoustofluidics… Source: Duke University… This post Tiny Acoustofluidic...
The Digital Health Update by Paul Sonnier ⋅ Jan 29, 2017 ⋅ #258

The Digital Health Update by Paul Sonnier ⋅ Jan 29, 2017 ⋅ #258

I made this announcement to 53,515 members of the Digital Health group on LinkedIn. If you’re on LinkedIn, please do join the group, which allows you to opt in to receiving these announcements in addition to connecting with thousands of other global stakeholders in digital health. Note that I will continue to update this announcement up until sending out the final version via LinkedIn. The Digital Health Update by Paul Sonnier ⋅ Jan 29, 2017 ⋅ #258 Dear Group, The most active VC investor in digital health, Vinod Khosla, has famously written that “Technology will reinvent healthcare as we know it. It is inevitable that, in the future, the majority of physicians’ diagnostic, prescription and monitoring–which over time may approach 80% of total doctors’/internists’ time spent on medicine–will be replaced by smart hardware, software, and testing. This is not to say 80% of physicians will be replaced, but rather 80% of what they currently do might be replaced so the roles doctors/internists play will likely be different and focused on the human aspects of medical practice such as empathy and ethical choices.” These types of productivity gains in healthcare delivery (created by digital health) could help offset the estimated $80–$100 billion in extra healthcare costs attributed to protectionist U.S. trade policies for doctors. What does that mean, you ask? Consider that a foreign-trained doctor must repeat their entire, multi-year residency program to practice medicine in the United States. According to Dean Baker, economist and co-founder of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, as a result of this protectionism we pay our doctors twice as much as the average for other wealthy countries....
YO Sperm Motility Testing and Counting at Home

YO Sperm Motility Testing and Counting at Home

We’ve already seen products that offer men the ability to do sperm counts in the privacy of home. Yet, sperm count is only one indicator of healthy fertility. Whether sperm are lively and energetic is another important parameter. Medical Electronic Systems, a well known name in laboratory equipment for sperm quality analysis, is about to release  a smartphone-powered sperm analysis system that lets you see the swimmers and count only the ones that are agile. The YO system consists of a microscope attachment that works with Apple iPhone and Samsung Galaxy smartphones, slides, pipettes, cups, and a liquefying powder. Two testing sets come in a box that will cost $49.   After the sample is obtained the old-fashioned way, it is prepared, placed onto a slide, and the slide inserted into the microscope attachment. Using a matching app that relies on the phone’s camera and light, the user can visualize the sperm and perform a count of only the moving sperm. The whole Testing process takes minutes and can be done discreetly. Here’s a promo video for YO that shows how to perform the test: Product page: YO… This post YO Sperm Motility Testing and Counting at Home appeared first on...