Serranator Alto PTA Serration Balloon Catheter Cleared by FDA

Serranator Alto PTA Serration Balloon Catheter Cleared by FDA

Cagent Vascular, a company based in Wayne, Pennsylvania, won FDA clearance for its Serranator Alto PTA Serration Balloon Catheter. Unlike other balloon catheters designed to dilate blood vessels, the Serranator Alto PTA has a series of teeth-like ridges on four sides of the balloon. As the balloon is pumped to push open a constricted vessel, the ridges create tiny serrations that help the vessel to expand. The newly formed serration lines help guide the expansion of the arteries being worked on. The device is indicated for treating the iliac, femoral, iliofemoral, and popliteal arteries and for the treatment of obstructive lesions of native or synthetic arteriovenous dialysis fistulae, according to Cagent. “A new approach to vessel dilatation is long overdue for treatment of diseased peripheral arteries. Today we are treating more complex lesions that require better tools. The Serranator is designed to create multiple longitudinal lines of interrupted micro-serrations to aid arterial expansion,” said vascular surgeon and Cagent Vascular co-founder Peter Schneider, MD, in a statement. “We believe Serration Technology will prove to be effective in more complex lesions and will evolve into the new standard of care for vessel dilatation. In the future we hope to show clinical benefit as a vessel preparation tool with new technologies such as drug coated balloons,” continued Dr. Schneider. Product page: Serranator… Via: Cagent Vascular This post Serranator Alto PTA Serration Balloon Catheter Cleared by FDA appeared first on...
Nano-Scale Straws for Non-destructive Monitoring of a Cell’s Interior

Nano-Scale Straws for Non-destructive Monitoring of a Cell’s Interior

Routine lab work to examine a host of biological parameters often depends on destructively lysing, or bursting, cells to release their contents for measurement. While this simple technique has been used for decades, it creates a constraint on protocol design because a given cell can only be analyzed once (when lysed) in a snapshot-like manner. A new technique developed at Stanford University enables researchers to non-destructively sample a cell’s interior, thus allowing for dynamic monitoring of the same cell over multiple time-points. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of cardiac cells grown on nanostraws. The nanostraws are not broken off by the beating of the cardiomyocytes but instead bend to accommodate the stress. Note that the cells are dehydrated during the microscopy preparation process so that the images are not indicative of cell morphology in culture. Instead, these images show that nanostraws survive after culture with beating cardiomyocytes. PNAS Inspired by natural gates (gap junctions) that allow cells to exchange substances, the Stanford team built an array of nano-scale hollow tubes 600 times thinner than a human hair. Cells grown on this Nanostraw Extraction (NEX) platform are subjected to a momentary electrical current, freeing some of the cellular contents to diffuse out and through the nanostraws for collection and analysis by standard lab techniques, such as ELISA or PCR. Coupling a transient current with these nanostraws allows the researchers to take multiple snapshots of a cell’s interior without killing it. The Stanford team tested the NEX platform on cell lines and human stem-cell derived heart and brain cells for up to 20 days, showing that it did not alter cell survival...
Improving Patient Engagement through Artificial Intelligence: Interview with Gilad Meiri, CEO & Co-Founder of Neura

Improving Patient Engagement through Artificial Intelligence: Interview with Gilad Meiri, CEO & Co-Founder of Neura

Successful patient engagement is a hallmark of success in the world of digital health. Thinking beyond the mobile app or wearable technology itself, Neura, a Silicon Valley-based company that was founded in 2013, has created a software platform that leverages artificial intelligence (AI) to improve patient engagement for better health outcomes. By integrating with Neura’s SDK, digital health technologies can dynamically key off of activity and lifestyle factors from the physical world around the user to contextualize the user experience for each individual. Today, Neura’s platform is already being used to impact the $300B challenge of medication adherence. Medgadget had a chance to sit down with CEO and Co-Founder Gilad Meiri to learn more about Neura’s platform and the company’s vision for improving patient engagement.   Mike Batista, Medgadget: We all know there is a vast world of mobile medical technologies out there trying to help people live better. What challenges do these technologies have today that Neura is working to solve? Gilad Meriri, Neura: Before now, medical and wellness solutions have been largely unaware of their users. They’re one-dimensional. A smart glucometer, for example, only sees a user’s historical blood glucose levels and whether they’ve taken their medication at a given time. However, it can’t detect how real-world events in a user’s life may be impacting their health. It is this holistic view that will help users improve their health. Neura’s artificial intelligence (AI) engine provides this needed holistic, “user-aware” view. Neura’s AI engine brings the physical world, or “outernet,” into apps. This is something traditional AI-based personalization solutions, like what you see in websites and ads, cannot do. For...
Fastest Brain-Computer Interface Lets Severely Paralyzed Type Quickly

Fastest Brain-Computer Interface Lets Severely Paralyzed Type Quickly

At Stanford University, researchers have given severely paralyzed people the fastest brain-computer interface yet. This is measured in terms of how fast they were able to type using an on-screen matrix of letters. Two patients with ALS and one with a spinal cord injury simply imagined moving a physical computer mouse, though their hands were stationary. Their intended movements generated within the brain were interpreted into the movements of a mouse on a screen. One of the patients in the study was able to type 39 characters per minute, and not using any word-completion software that are common on smartphones. Of course if this technology is coupled with such software, such patients may be nearly as quick as healthy people at texting. There are other hurdles to overcome before that is practically and commonly feasible, such as developing long lasting wireless implants which don’t lead to infections and can be used continuously for years. Here’s more from Stanford: Study in eLife: High performance communication by people with paralysis using an intracortical brain-computer interface… Via: Stanford This post Fastest Brain-Computer Interface Lets Severely Paralyzed Type Quickly appeared first on...
Stryker to Use Microsoft HoloLens Augmented Reality Goggles to Design ORs

Stryker to Use Microsoft HoloLens Augmented Reality Goggles to Design ORs

Stryker, the company best known for orthopedic implants and devices, is also in the business of designing operating rooms. Planning an efficient surgical environment that can serve various needs has meant trying different configurations in real life, or on a small, flat computer screen. Since it seems like we’re living in the future, Stryker has now partnered with Microsoft to use the latter’s HoloLens augmented reality headset to help it quickly try different options, even at full scale, without to physically move anything. Here’s a video about the project with the people that will be using the HoloLens in practice: More from Microsoft… This post Stryker to Use Microsoft HoloLens Augmented Reality Goggles to Design ORs appeared first on...