Image via ACS Nano

Immunotherapy techniques for fighting cancer generally fall into two categories: preventing tumor cells from evading the immune system’s T cells and summoning T cells to attack the tumors. Now scientists at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have developed nanoparticles that perform both tasks at the same time, significantly improving the effectiveness of immunotherapy in a study on laboratory mice.

The nanoparticles carry one antibody that blocks an inhibitory signal that helps tumors hide from the immune system, and a second antibody that warns T cells to activate and fight the tumor. The Hopkins scientists have dubbed these as “immunoswitch” nanoparticles since they effectively flip the immunity processes that would normally take place around tumor cells.

The team tested the new approach on mice with melanoma and colon cancer, demonstrating much slower tumor growth, improved survival, and even full remission in up to half the mice studied.

Study in journal ACS Nano: Dual Targeting Nanoparticle Stimulates the Immune System To Inhibit Tumor Growth…

Via: American Chemical Society…